Boss Up with Bevin Your dream life is at the end of your comfort zone

2020-06-28

Participant or bystander?

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — Bevin @ 7:52 pm

(This post is a series of daily letters from me to my future children reporting from the emerging paradigm.)

Dear Kids:

At the beginning of the month Rev Michael Bernard Beckwith announced that the theme for June would be “History in the Making: Participant or Bystander?”

The entire June 2020 series at Agape is worth watching (each Sunday service is archived, I have a fondness for his second sermon of the day since it’s a bit longer). It’s been incredibly empowering and motivating for me.

Clearly, I reference MBB regularly on this letter series and I choose for him to be a major influence in my life. I love the call-to-arms that this theme brings, we are in a historical time and we are choosing whether we participate.

There are so many ways to show up for movements, but I really liked this sentiment my friend Ariel posted for Pride today. “Today, Pride Day, I hope I’m less racist and more ferocious than I was a year ago and I hope next year I’m less racist and more ferocious again.”

This takes learning, trying, failing, evaluating, getting better, learning trying… I repeat this frequently because “the work” of life is this. Getting uncomfortable, being afraid to screw it up, doing it anyway (or not–BYSTANDING) and continuing forward.

Someone said recently the best apology she could receive is just for the offending person to do better.

Anyway, today I wanted to reflect on being a participant (in the arena) or a bystander (being afraid, shutting down and hoping the Great Uprising goes away).

It’s scary to talk about race for fear of getting it wrong. But white feelings aren’t more important than Black lives and comfort zones of white folks is what has kept us in this place for far too long. Listen to 2 minutes by Malcolm X.

That’s why I’m focusing on building up my capacity to have the hard conversations and sharing that with other folks. Participate!

xoxo,

Mom

This blog is entirely supported by Patreon. Every dollar counts to making this work sustainable and maintaining the archives of this blog. Thanks to my awesome Patronus supporters (as my mom calls them) for co-creating with me!

2020-06-27

Evaluated Experience

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — Bevin @ 3:28 pm

(This post is a series of daily letters from me to my future children reporting from the emerging paradigm.)

Dear Kids:

I mentioned the term evaluated experience in yesterday’s letter and I wanted to expand on that today. I work with coaches who help me evaluate experiences and I find the external lens from someone who has been through what I’m going through so very helpful.

Today my business coach gave me some concrete questions to ask myself when I’m going through challenges that I’ll be putting in the front cover of my journal to return to.

Why is this happening? What can I learn from this? What can be good about this?

Using these questions as a positive way to spin challenges. (Not a woe is me why is this happening, just a why is this happening for our growth.) Our perspective is often the only thing we can control and evaluated experience is how we grow through the things we go through.

I’ve seen lots of folks repeat the same challenges again and again because they never evaluate the lessons. Or change! Life is about the lessons and when you don’t learn them you’re doomed to repeat them. You’re going to outgrow people like this. Let them be.

Something that’s asked for in accountability processes around racism is doing better! Learning from mistakes. That’s where evaluated experience comes in. White folks need other white folks to process with when we screw up and want to do better. Getting called out is a gift, the opportunity in it is to be a kinder human being and make the world a little easier and more survivable for other folks.

xoxo,

Mom

Pride 2020==masks. No large gatherings. From the socially distanced neighborhood singing group I’m part of.

This blog is entirely supported by Patreon. Every dollar counts to making this work sustainable and maintaining the archives of this blog. Thanks to my awesome Patronus supporters (as my mom calls them) for co-creating with me!

2020-06-20

Pride is a Rebellion

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — Bevin @ 3:26 pm

(This post is a series of daily letters from me to my future children reporting from the emerging paradigm.)

Dear Kids:

Last night I was reflecting on having a quiet Friday night in June. How just 10 years ago I would have looked at that as a failure. I was so enlivened by going out and celebrating Pride that I didn’t want it to stop and soaked up every opportunity.

Living in NYC meant a Pride festival pretty much every weekend (and, when we were lucky, the Mermaid parade would land on the weekend between Brooklyn Pride and NYC Pride). I called June “Gay Stamina Month” for a long time.

I was taking last night easy because this morning I did a very Day Gay event (11AM start time). I taught aerobics in a cannabis healing event for LGBTQIA+ folks and their allies as a fundraiser for Project Q. (For more info on Project Q and what they do, check out my podcast episode with Sabine Maxine who is the Director of Programs.)

Rest is an important component of self care for everyone, and especially for me in my healing work. I consider teaching Fat Kid Dance Party a healing.

I was remembering last night I used to live at this pace: going going going burn out / get sick / rest a little going going going / repeat. Now it’s rest, teach/agitate/rebel, rest, heal myself, rest. I’m soooo grateful for the internet that enables me to live someplace where I can rest and heal effectively and still participate in the world and connecting to folks. The internet, our global brain, is what is making this time in herstory so possible.

When I produced my first event at Stonewall I learned from the manager that they call Stonewall a Rebellion not a Riot. It’s an important distinction that I think is important to remember.

Our foremothers (primarily Black Trans women and butches) were rebelling against consistent persistent abuse from the police. Pride began as a rebellion, a protest.

The fact that today we get to “party” for Pride is it’s own kind of rebellion. Queer folks loving themselves and partying and dancing in celebration is rebelling against homophobia/transphobia/systems of oppression. But what’s most important is that we rebel in the spirit of everyone being liberated. I wish I had centered that idea more concretely when I was deep in my plus size party girl days but it’s never too late to learn and live our values.

My hope for you is that you remember that just because something is a law doesn’t mean it’s ethical. (Sodomy laws were still on the books in many states until 2003 when the Supreme Court released Lawrence v Texas.)

And that you know how important it is to distinguish rebellions from riots.

Happy Pride!

xoxo,

Mom

Lavender foxgloves are near the highways when I drive to town but there are only two plants in the forest along the path I walk. So special, and blooming just for Pride month!

This blog is entirely supported by Patreon. Every dollar counts to making this work sustainable and maintaining the archives of this blog. Thanks to my awesome Patronus supporters (as my mom calls them) for co-creating with me!

2017-06-20

The Commodification of LGBTQ Pride: How Capitalism Co-Opts Movements

I was cruising through Target the other day, and I saw a field of rainbow gear in the clothing section. At the same Target a year ago, there was one wall of Pride stuff and I thought that was a lot. An entire clothing section dedicated to rainbows for June was pretty remarkable growth within a year. There were pool floats, pride flag shawls, so many tanks and tee shirts with a lot of clever pride sayings, and a whole unicorn costume onesie that I almost called Dara to beg to buy. There were even tee shirts for couples to wear together to complete a rainbow for the ultimate dykealike experience and… PREFERRED PRONOUN PINS. At Target.

It is totally possible to hold multiple conflicting emotions at once and I had a bunch in the Target Pride section.

Surprised! In 1997—just twenty years ago—my gay mom would take her upside down triangle rainbow window cling off her car before I drove it. She didn’t want me to have to take the risk of homophobic hate crimes and I wasn’t out of the closet yet. It surprises me how far the acceptance of LGBT folks has come in my lifetime.

Validated! Listen, it’s capitalism. They are doing this because there are gay dollar$ to be made off of this and they want to cash in on this market. In the 70s being gay could get you fired or killed, and while that is still true today in many places, it is pretty amazing that you can come out and a big box store is giving you a high five by supplying your Pride gear.

My friend Franny at Dyke Day LA.

Delighted! I love rainbow stuff. In school I was very into school spirit, dressing up and rah rah for the team and I feel like my inherent cheerleader tendencies come out a lot when it comes to Gay Pride stuff. I love a good rainbow outfit, I love to wave a Pride flag in the right environment.

Heartened! I genuinely appreciate the show of support Target is giving the queer community by putting out this Pride section. Their show of solidarity in this instance is certainly well-intentioned. And in this political day and age when our rights could be dumped literally any minute, it’s nice to have entities give us that high five. (Though I do wonder if the Targets in Red States have big ol’ Pride sections.)

Annoyed! It always feels a type of way for me when businesses co-opt a movement. It used to be that I could only buy Pride gear on a special trip to a store in the Castro, and now those stores have all shut down and big box retailers are selling our Pride gear. It appears that more and more straight folks are going to Pride events because queers throw the best parties (we do) and they’ll put on a rainbow because it doesn’t matter, love is love! Rainbows aren’t just for queers anymore.

Maybe you’re not rainbow identified and you just want to be queer. Here’s a great shirt for that, available up to 3X, from queer non-binary owned Genuine Valentine!

Angry! At the commodification of Pride. Maybe Target should take a dollar (not even ten percent) of each of the shirts/Pride shawls they sell and give it to an LGBT non profit that benefits the most marginalized in our communities. But they’re not. The webpage selling their Pride gear sports a hashtag but not anything about donating to LGBT causes. The gay + ally dollar$ spent in that rainbow section are going to Target stockholders.

Big businesses mean well, they really do. They think they are helping when they have a big rainbow Levi’s store window or put together a social justice advertisement and slap their logo on the end of it. And in this day and age where most of the US spends their waking hours hypnotized on TV, those social justice commercials do make a difference. I really believe for it. However it does take most of the moxie out of the movement when it goes corporate.

Unbought and Unbossed! I love this Shirley Chisholm Lapel Pin from Radical Dreams–all products benefit community organizations.

Capitalism is a system that centers the privatization of resources. Movements are not owned by one person and are an amalgamation of ideas. Pride started out as a rebellion against homophobic and transphobic policing of queer people.

That general idea of “LGBTQ people deserve rights” pushed Pride forward annually and then as the movement grew, certain facets became privatized. Pride festivals became privatized in lots of ways, I would venture to say most common is someone in the first collective who started a Pride event in a city managed to be the last person standing so now they own it as {Whatever City} Pride Inc. and make curation choices with or without community input, charge admission, get sponsorships and make money off of producing Pride.

I brought my Femme Protection candle from (Queer Fat Femme owned) Last Craft with me to anchor my altar at Dyke Day! I charged a Femme Resilience magical incense blend while galavanting on my blankets with my pals. This candle is fabulous for Femme magic work and my new go-to gift for Femme birthdays.

Now corporations are putting rainbows all over things and making money off of what our Pride symbols mean to us–that same general idea that LGBTQ people deserve rights. They are taking an idea from a movement and privatizing resources associated with expressing it.

As I watch the body positive movement continue to be co-opted by corporations for their profit, it also heartens/validates/disappoints/angers/annoys me. Fifteen years ago when I was yelling Love Your Body on stage it was a revolutionary stance and now Lane Bryant just uses it to sell stuff.

At the same time, it is still revolutionary for people to hear that loving their fat body is an option so I guess net positive? While cashing in on Pride and body positivity feels kind of icky, it is still awesome that so many corporations are standing in solidarity with LGBT people in this political climate, and it is revolutionary that fat teenagers are getting the message however it comes to them that loving their fat bodies is an option.

I got this FEMME shirt at The Plus Bus. It was originally produced by Forever 21. Did they mean to print my gender identity on a shirt as a Pride thing or just coincidence?

Pride events over time have become so corporate. What began as a rebellion—honoring what happened at Stonewall, where trans women of color were tired of being harassed by cops. As Pride events gained notoriety and acceptance, corporations started sponsoring them. I remember my first Pride in San Francisco in 2000 leaving with swag bags full of corporate logos and fans promoting Queer as Folk (remember that show?) about to debut on Showtime. It’s only gotten more intense and it has been years since I’ve gone to a Pride event with corporate sponsors.

Instead I have gravitated towards Dyke Marches, which at least maintain a separation from corporate sponsorship, are community run and funded. You see almost everyone you know or have slept with in town which is why some call it “The Ex March.” In LA it isn’t even a march, it’s just a park hangout and it is THE BEST. (I’m still so fresh to LA so I only see people I am excited to see.)

Dyke Day LA was SO FUN. Epic overlapping hangouts with so many rad folks. (Here, EK, Dara, Kean and Corina.)

Dyke Day LA costs thousands to produce and that money is raised through community fundraisers throughout the year. Community organizing is exhausting work and I am so grateful for the folks who put in the time to carve out space in Pride month that is totally separate from a corporate agenda.

It’s nice that we have this space that is maintained because of the values of the Dykes that came before us. We only have it when there are community members willing to do the work and others willing to donate towards it. (It’s also a great way to meet folks—I met a group of people who completely changed my life when I worked on the Philly Dyke March committee.)

In a Kristen and Tristan sandwich!

I have been thinking a lot about how we resist the capitalism that has seeped into Pride. I think it’s by continuing to push the envelope. Queer means a lot of things but one definition I like most is queer as in weird.

Once you’ve opened up to a sexuality that steps outside of the heterosexual paradigm I think you’re more likely to think outside the box in other ways. Most queers keep things weird and push towards justice, whatever they believe that to be. When corporations grab ahold of what used to be chanted from the streets it ends up this kind of washed and faded version of something we have in full color. I love that queers keep making great anti-capitalist signs for Pride and showing up for resistance.

Philly has pushed the Pride envelope this year by changing the Pride flag to add Black and Brown—a sign of solidarity with the too often marginalized LGBT people of color who are and have been essential to this movement. The backlash is as you would expect from White LGBT folks who don’t see how important this move is to queers of color. I’m here for anything that makes POC feel more supported in the movement–and it’s so new that it’s not reflected in the Pride section at Target.

I’ll admit that I totally bought that $12 Pride shawl (before I knew there was a new rainbow flag!) after much hemming and hawing. I’ve never seen a rainbow shawl for sale and I ultimately want to give a thumbs up to Target’s gesture of (economically beneficial to them) solidarity. But I also spend lots of dollars directly to queers for their hard work and craftspersonship.

I know that Pride can’t actually be bought, and you can’t monetize the feeling of a young queer person at their first Pride parade, because even if Absolut is sponsoring the float that baby queer is paying way more attention to their crush or cruising.

If you want to sport your Pride in a more dapper and baller way, consider purchasing exquisite gender equal footwear designed by my pal NiK Kacy a very active member of the LGBTQ community.

I wonder how long it will take for corporations to adjust to the new Pride flag? I wonder what is now chanted in the streets that twenty years from now will be sanitized for the masses? I hope we keep pushing the envelope and I hope we keep prioritizing real queer people over corporations.

BTW this is NOT a sponsored post (I would tell you) but if Target wants to pass some of their profits to a queer artist out here speaking my truth I am open to sponsorship as long as it is my words and ideas!

2015-05-04

How Castro Valley is Not the Castro

Among my army of incredible friends and community, we have a few aesthetic tropes that are common–tattoos chief among them. When I was younger and still shedding muggle ideas of normalcy I remember being sort of shocked when someone would just get a tattoo on a whim. You didn’t plot this for years and meticulously scour for the right artist? You got it off the wall?

Not everyone thinks like a Capricorn with a Virgo rising. I’m an Earth sign. Permanency is a big decision. Some people tattoo on whims and some people tattoo with great plans and down payments and sessions. Most folks blend a bit of both.

That’s not the tattoo point I wanted to make. There’s a pattern in my tattooed friends’ bodies. They get home state nostalgia tattoos. They come in lots of types, an esoteric homage, a sign, but most common is a map outline with optional home city starred.

Here’s what I’m talking about.

17184687429_3ff3439afa_zHeart where the hometown is. Photo courtesy Amanda Arkansassy. You can check out the livefeed of the show she is co-curating on June 13th, Y’all Come Back Now: Queer Stories of Southern Migration.

17368951392_f4c6b7bee4_zHere’s one of just the region–Southern Illinois. Photo of Matthew Baccus.

17184687499_f1bbe5117f_zMatt and his best friend Meade have matching soil tattoos to indicate Southern Illinois. A home town tattoo is a great mile marker to get when you leave someplace.

This tattoo trope is so common that, when crowd sourcing for an image to use I got enough offers to start a whole USA collage art piece. And Victoria said her tattoo artist told her she would cross over into hipster in a forever way when she got her Minnesota outline.

It’s a Thing.

But it’s not really a Thing I can get behind for myself. I’ve thought about it a bunch, as an ex-patriate Californian of Bay Area origins. I moved to the East Coast in early August 2000. I needed a good dose of time and space from where I grew up and it’s not all healed yet. I created survival tips for returning to my home town. I don’t want a tattoo of my home town.

I do love and appreciate California, especially anywhere but my hometown. The redwoods, San Francisco, Yosemite, Santa Cruz… I even developed a deep appreciation for Southern California, which was a steep climb considering the regional disdain for our So Cal neighbors that Northern Californians instill. (Not all folks feel this way but it is an attitude you’d notice.) I kind of love LA now. I adore Palm Springs, where my beloved Grandmother lives.

When we were driving to Northern CA for my partner to have a work meeting in San Francisco during our post-chemo road trip last Fall, she made the mistake of confusing my hometown of Castro Valley, CA with the famous district of The Castro in San Francisco. The two places are only a 30 minute drive apart, but could not be further from one another in many ways.

I wasn’t so excited to show Dara my hometown, but it was very important for me to dispel any confusing thoughts she had about the two places. I share below some of the highlights.

Castro Valley is known by most folks who live or have lived in the Bay as a place on interstate 580. Coming in from the Central Valley, it’s just past Pleasanton/Dublin, just before Hayward/San Lorenzo. This is what it looks like to enter Castro Valley.
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In contrast, The Castro, is known the world over as a hive for gay liberation and historically was a haven for queer folks who needed a place to be accepted. Now it’s a lot more expensive to live there, but is still a destination for LGBT tourists. This is what you see when you drive into The Castro. Very different from Castro Valley.
15818102011_b0dcdda220_zNote the mega giant Pride flag on the right, the legendary Castro theater ahead to the left.

In Castro Valley, I had Dara drive down the main drag, Castro Valley Boulevard. “The Boulevard” as it is known. Here’s one of my favorite spots from when I was a teen. The Starbucks. (Back in 1995/1996 Starbucks was not yet ubiquitous.)
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In the Castro, we strolled across the street from yet another cute new indie coffee shop in The Castro.
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Things in Castro Valley are pretty regular and suburban looking. Because it’s the suburbs. 15634168219_7eaba6c0e2_z

Things in The Castro look like a vibrant neighborhood in a major metropolitan city, because it’s the city. “The City” is what we would call San Francisco in Castro Valley.
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When I was a teenager my best friends and I would hang out at this McDonald’s a lot. Hanging out at fast food places and Lyon’s were kind of the thing to do. There’s not even a mall in Castro Valley, we would have to go to Pleasanton or Hayward for that.
15818098101_6813f65712_z

When I was a teenager I didn’t find any girls to make out with in The Castro, but we could have smooched here. I don’t think we would have even been able to hold hands safely in Castro Valley.
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The most significant landmark in Castro Valley is the three crosses leaping up from the hill at Three Crosses church, one of the two (maybe more now) mega Christian churches in town.
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The Castro, as seen from Twin Peaks, has a very different significant landmark.
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On my visit to The Castro I was sad to note that the place I bought my first Pride rings is closed… But that was almost twenty years ago so it had a good run.
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In Castro Valley, the streets are just streets.
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In The Castro, the streets are actually paved with rainbows.
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Anyway, now you know why The Castro and Castro Valley are not the same thing. And this is only just a whisper of why I’m not leaping to get a Castro Valley hometown nostalgia tattoo. My mom’s house is cute, but when she talks about selling it to downsize for her and her wife’s retirement… I’m okay to let it go.

I see my friends who have so much pride in and love for the places they come from inked on their bodies. And I’m sure they also feel some complexity, too. Hopefully this is a piece of solidarity for those folks who feel really great to let their hometowns go, and hope to do healing work around it.

2011-05-31

NYC Queer Nightlife Magic: June is Full of Heart and Soul and Events With Bevin

June means New York City is sweaty and alive with possibility. Between Brooklyn Pride (June 11), the Mermaid Parade (June 18), Gay Pride (June 26) and all of the other opportunities to hang out with your pals/make new ones June is always a time for social stamina pants.

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Me and Regie Cabico, who is in town for Rebel Cupcake Pride Happy Hour on June 25th.

This June I have created a calendar of really amazing events and I hope you get the chance to come out to one or many of them. Details are below, but first a list and dates!

Wed, June 1, 10pm-2a @ Stonewall: LEZ DANCE: A Trans Women Belong Here Dance Party Fundraiser
Thurs, June 9, 10pm-2a @ Sugarland: Rebel Cupcake 14: Love Long Distance (Gossip Tribute)
Fri, June 17, 7pm-10pm @ 116: How Long ‘Til My Soul Gets It Right: A Trans Women Belong Here Cocktail Party Fundraiser
Sat, June 25, 6pm-9pm @ Stonewall: Rebel Cupcake Pride Happy Hour Poetry/Hip-Hop Salon
Thurs, July 14, 10pm-2a @ Sugarland: Rebel Cupcake 15: Dirty Dancing

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 * New York, NY
Bevin Branlandingham presents…
LEZ DANCE: A Dance Party Benefiting Trans Women Blong Here
10PM-2AM Dancing; $5-$20 sliding scale
Late night dancing til 2a
Stonewall: 59 Christopher Street, NYC

DJ Polar Sounds on the decks serving you dance jams!!

More info about Trans Women Belong Here, “an informal organization of past, present, and future attendees of the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival (MWMF) who are taking active steps towards welcoming all woman-identified women to the festival.” This event will benefit their scholarship fund.


Thursday, June 9th, 2011 * Brooklyn, NY
Bevin Branlandingham Presents
Rebel Cupcake 14: Love Long Distance (Tribute to The Gossip)
10PM-2AM Dancing; show 11ish * $7
($2 off admission if you are on our texty texty list)
Late night dancing til 4a
Sugarland: 221 N 9th St @ Roebling, Brooklyn, NY
(3 blocks from the Bedford L subway stop)

Rebel Cupcake: a flamboyant queer dance party for all shapes & flavors!

*Sugarland DJ Bryan Black spins slow jams & riot grrrl favs to get you going, dance beats all night to keep you moving at a house party level–perfect for dancing and mingling! The dance party is a tribute to The Gossip and Beth Ditto this month, with plenty of 80s, 90s & contemporary dance mixed in.

*Performances by:

*ThiswayThatway, *dandified performance artist* from Oakland, CA
ThiswayThatway (aka Cecilio Cooper) is a dandified performance artist who enjoys the messy collision of glitter and theory. They explore blackness, sexuality, and gender through video, textiles, and drag/neo-burlesque traditions. Based in Oakland, ThiswayThatway has wreaked havoc on stages across North America, including: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (SF), 9:30 Club (DC), Hippodrome (PDX), Emo’s (AUS), The Metro (CHI), and Toronto Pride (CAN). thisway-thatway.com

cooperK2_Dave Goldencrop-1.jpg
Photo by Dave Golden
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Photo by Victor Douglas

*Amanda Cheong, Brooklyn, NY / Sydney, AUS
Amanda Cheong comes from the land down under, where the women glow and
the men plunder. Currently an alien based in New York, this she-stache
wielding ghey has taken a break from riding kangaroos and hanging out
with Koalas to bring some aussie performance to your shores. Joining
the Sydney queer performance scene in 2007, Amanda brought politics to
the stage with her weird and quirky shows. Disgusting, astounding and
humoring audiences till they screamed for more.

muscle_suit_pose.jpg

*The Queer Chorus, Brooklyn’s own
Their debut performance! It’s like your friends are in Glee performing Queer songs!

Special Guest:
*Nailed by Ally Nail Booth!
Get your nails fancy for $15 from 10pm-2am!

*Nogga Schwartz ready to decorate your facebook page with antics from our wild photo booth!

*Hella foxy Hana Malia, our stylish and charming door captain.

We’ll have chairs out during the performances and there is a lot of seating available in grottos and at the bar. This is a great party to be loungey and social or dancey. The show will be over by midnight so earlybirds can make it home–the show is about 30 minutes long.

As always, free cupcakes while they last! Vegan & gluten free sometimes available.

Accessibility notes: The stage area and bar are wheelchair accessible. Coming into the venue is a little narrow but there are no stairs to enter or to get to the main seating area for the show. Lots of street parking available. (Please let me know if you need any accommodations!)


Friday, June 17, 2011 * New York, NY
Bevin Branlandingham presents…
How Long ‘Til My Soul Gets It Right: A Cocktail Party Benefiting Trans Women Belong Here
7PM-10PM Dancing, Raffle, Mingling! * Pay What You Will
116: 116 MacDougal Street, (West Village) NYC

Happy Hour 2 for 1 drinks from 7-10 special for our event! And a special mocktail available for those who aren’t drinking.

DJ Polar Sounds on the decks serving you dance jams!! Buy a raffle ticket and win fabulous prizes!

Please get in touch if you would like to co-host the event, assist in any way, or donate raffle prizes!! queerfatfemme at gmail.com


Saturday, June 25, 2011 * New York, NY
Bevin Branlandingham presents…
Rebel Cupcake Pride Poetry Salon
6PM-9PM, Show at 7PM sharp; $5-$10 sliding scale
Stonewall: 59 Christopher Street, NYC

The Pride collision of many queer poets in one venue!
Featuring REGIE CABICO, Washington, DC–Def Poetry Jam, Nuyorican Poetry Cafe winner

I love Regie Cabico. He is one of my favorite poets in the world and one time when I was falling in love with this girl I played her a Regie Cabico poem on the beach on one of the most incredible dates of my life. The girl is gone but Regie lives on. He loves this story.

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Regie brings with him some amazing pals from England:

DOMINIC BERRY, Manchester, England
ROD TAME, Manchester, England
& More!

2009-06-01

Femme Pride Week 2009!

femmeprideweek
Damien called this photo the perfect greeting card for Happy Pride Month*! We took it outside the fabulous queer Brooklyn dance party “That’s My Jam” (same name as that FemmeCast episode) last weekend. The glorious part of my new apartment is that it is walking distance to this magic.

If you are anywhere near NYC this weekend, you NEED to make a trip! The Femme Family has been working really hard to prepare our first ever FEMME PRIDE WEEK! As the denmother of the queerscouts I’ve put together a little itinerary to make your week super fabulous and well-organized (I am a Capricorn).

It all starts on June 3! With our second Speaking of Femme event. The first one was amazing, powerful and inspirational. We’ve got an even bigger line-up and we’re really excited!

Wednesday, June 3, 2009 * New York City, NY
Speaking of Femme II

7-9PM* $5 suggested donation
Bluestockings: 172 Allen St.

Featured readers:
> Felicia Luna Lemus
> Leslie Freeman
> Heather Acs
> Judy Yu
> Najva Sol
> Mira Bellwether
> Amanda Krupman

Femmeceed by Co-Head Madams
Bevin Branlandingham [http://queerfatfemme.com]
and Damien Luxe
[http://www.axondluxe.com]

speaking_of_femme_2

Friday, June 5th there are two amazing events worthy of your attention and party hopping.

First is a reading/book party for the launch of the new book Lessons from the Fatosphere.

It’s at Re/Dress, 109 Boerum Place, Brooklyn, NY.
6:30-8pm shopping, mingling + book buying/signing.
8pm reading
Post reading dance party! (There are fat go-go dancers.)
Free!

At 10PM I am moving on to the going away party/benefit for Slow Jams, a former vegan current ethical butcher (!) moving to Portland and the event is produced by his girlfriend, a queer femme from the Femme Family, and Axon D’Luxe is performing (my co-head madam of the Femme Family) as well as djed by a queer femme and there are bound to be lots of hotties dancing. It’s going to be a great event with great music.

solongslowjams

Saturday, June 6, 2009 * New York City, NY
Femme Family Coming Out Party!
doors at 9:30p, show at 10p, dancing and mingling ’til 2a! $5-$10 sliding scale
The Historic Stonewall Inn, 53 Christopher St.

Pride kick off & coming out party for NYC’s newest queer femme + allies organization.

We’re reclaiming the space of the Stonewall Riots to celebrate and honor our Femme foremothers & transwarriors who fought for pride, justice and our right to be fabulous.

Fabulous cabaret performance, great music at a house party level perfect for dancing AND mingling (we’re being really intentional about making community & fun all at once). Signature cocktail: Glittertini! Dress: Footloose & fancy free!

www.femmefamily.com

Performers include:
Miasia, world class belly dancer! [http://www.miasia.org/]
Liza Deception, burlesque
Glenn Marla, Tranny Superstar [http://www.myspace.com/smulyan]
Heather Acs, Performance Art Wildflower
Axon D’Luxe, mixed media electrotext wordsmith [http://www.axondluxe.com/]
Bevin Branlandingham, Femmecee & Host of FemmeCast [http://queerfatfemme.com]
Maggie Crowley, The Femme Show [http://www.thefemmeshow.com]

AfroTitty & the Fierce Force go-go squad

MORE TBA!

DJ:
Shomi Noise

INTERACTIVE FEMME HISTORY PROJECT:

Bring a homemade poster and some copies providing a visual and textual history of your femme heroes to display & give away!

Sunday, June 7, 2009 * New York City, NY

Go have brunch at my newfound discovery, Cheryl’s Global Soul. Chris and I don’t know for sure if she’s “family” but she is nice to look at from a brunch table.

*I am always a really big fan of June in NYC. With the killer combo of the weather warming up, perpetual students finishing their finals and the flurry of pride festivals beginning, there’s never a dull weekend. I’m a girl who loves to travel but I rarely dream of leaving NYC during June.

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